NZ BOOKLOVERS AWARDS 2022

NZ Booklovers Awards 2022 Winners

City of Vengeance by D.V. Bishop wins the NZ Booklovers Award for Best Adult Fiction Book 2022,

The judges say, ‘A stunning debut novel, D V Bishop's City of Vengeance seamlessly blends historical fiction with crime thriller, as detective-protagonist Cesare Aldo investigates a murder in 1536 Florence and uncovers an intra-familial plot (which really happened) against the ruling Duke of Florence, a member of the ultra-powerful de' Medici clan. Storytelling centred on intrigue and betrayal doesn't come more polished and captivating than this, and among the novel's best features are the figure of Aldo, a redoubtable and humane lead; the unflinching depiction of a filthy, dangerous Renaissance city which diverges from the typical romantic portrayals of European sites; and the rejection of the heteronormativity common to almost all historical fiction - Bishop shows this place and era to be as diverse in human desire and commerce as anywhere in the present.’

 

Homecooked: Seasonal Recipes for Everyday by Lucy Corry, The Kitchenmaid wins the NZ Booklovers Award for Best Lifestyle Book 2022

The judges say, ‘Homecooked is more than just a cookbook; it’s an artwork, a treasure, and a gift to yourself, or for someone you love. The presentation is stunning; from the bright, sculptural, cover, to the mouth-watering butter-yellow end-plates. The design is both contemporary and nostalgic.

But even a handsome hardback cookbook has to be more than just delicious to look at. Lucy Corry’s recipes, which are arranged seasonally, make heroes of everyday ingredients that are easy to find in Aotearoa.  Homecooked celebrates the joy of cooking, with simple but delicious recipes that will revive your taste-buds. And as we find greater solace in our homes, and the joys of home-cooking, we are also reminded that fresh, seasonal and local ingredients are not only better for you, but also better for the planet.’

Kia Kaha: A Storybook of Māori Who Changed the World by Stacey Morrison and Jeremy Sherlock NZ Booklovers Award for Best Children’s Book 2022

The judges say, ‘This is a powerful illustrated storybook and an inspiring compendium that celebrates Māori who have done incredible things. From individuals to groups, historic to contemporary history, every entry showcases Māori who have blazed a trail of their own. Illustrated by a host of 12 talented Māori artists, each of whom brings their own flavour to the mini biographies, Kia Kaha is a very special book for readers of all ages. It will inspire every reader, of every generation, to draw on their own strengths and abilities. This is a highly engaging book and wonderful resource that will fill readers with hope and aroha.’

storytelling.’

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NZ Booklovers Awards 2022 Shortlist 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Booklovers Award for Best Adult Fiction Book 2022

Both Feet in Paradise by Andy Southall (The Cuba Press)

City of Vengeance by D V Bishop (Macmillan Publishers)

Everything Changes by Stephanie Johnson (Vintage)

Isobar Precinct by Angelique Kasmara (The Cuba Press)

The Lighthouse by Christopher Parker (Beacon Press)

The Liminal Space by Jacquie McRae (Huia Publishers)

The Remarkable Miss Digby by Patricia Donovan (Mary Egan Publishing)

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Booklovers Award for Best Lifestyle Book 2022

The Edible Backyard by Kath Irvine (Godwit)

Fish of the Day by Clarke Gayford and Mike Bhana (Penguin Books)

Homecooked by Lucy Corry, The Kitchenmaid (Penguin Books)

Saffron Swirls and Cardamom Dust by Ashia Ismail-Singer (Bateman Books)

Simply Food by Eleanor Ozich (Penguin Books)

Who Lived There? by Nicola McCloy (Random House New Zealand)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Booklovers Award for Best Children’s Book 2022

Atua: Māori Gods and Heroes by Gavin Bishop (Penguin Random House)

The Eight Gifts of Te Wheke by Steph Matuku (Huia Publishers)

The Greatest Haka Festival on Earth by Pania Tahau-Hodges (Huia Publishers)

Kia Kaha: A Storybook of Māori Who Changed the World by Stacey Morrison and Jeremy Sherlock (Penguin Random House)

Kōwhai and the Giants by Kate Parker (Little Love)

My Elephant is Blue by Melinda Szymanik, illustrated by Vasanti Unka (Penguin Random House)

The winner in each category will be announced on 17 March 2022, and each winner receives $500 from NZ Booklovers.

 

The Best Adult Fiction Book Award is judged by author, reviewer and judge of the Ngaio Marsh Awards Stephanie Jones, publishing professional Rachel White, and NZ Booklovers Director and author Karen McMillan.

The Best Lifestyle Book Award is judged by journalist and author Andrea Molloy, former magazine editor and lifestyle journalist Peta Stavelli, and publisher, home renovator and foodie Iain McKenzie.

The Best Children’s Book Award is judged by author and creative writing teacher Paddy Richardson, writer and former editor Heidi North, and early childhood kaiako and journalist Rebekah Lyell.

 

Judges’ comments:

ADULT FICTION

Both Feet in Paradise by Andy Southall: ‘An enjoyable and engaging read, set in the tropical paradise of Samoa. Adam is trying to get a flight back home to his family, but there are many obstacles in his way. Just as the seemingly never-ending events start to get frustrating, the story switches to Eve’s perspective and things start to make sense. It is a story that keeps you turning the pages, cleverly and sensitively written, and an insight into the different ways memories are processed and events are perceived.’

 

City of Vengeance by D.V. Bishop: ‘A stunning debut novel, D V Bishop's City of Vengeance seamlessly blends historical fiction with crime thriller, as detective-protagonist Cesare Aldo investigates a murder in 1536 Florence and uncovers an intra-familial plot (which really happened) against the ruling Duke of Florence, a member of the ultra-powerful de' Medici clan. Storytelling centred on intrigue and betrayal doesn't come more polished and captivating than this.’

 

Everything Changes by Stephanie Johnson: ‘When their dog kills the neighbour’s cat, it is the catalyst for Col and Davie to move house and start a new life in a run-down motel. This slice-of-life novel has a cast of thoroughly entertaining characters. Told through the voices of each of the characters (including the insightful dog), the story is sad, sometimes confronting, hilarious and clever. It is a pacy read and a fabulous romp through Auckland and its surrounds.’

 

Isobar Precinct by Angelique Kasmara: ‘A singular, compelling and artful work of fiction, Angelique Kasmara's Isobar Precinct centres on people often overlooked and shunted to society's margins, and explores themes and events with uncomfortable parallels with real-life events. Kasmara's prose is striking in its clarity, boldness and lack of pretence – much like the novel's characters – and she succeeds in making a storyline with a technically impossible element (no spoilers) entirely plausible and convincing. A brilliant debut that marks Kasmara as already one of our stand-out novelists.’

 

The Lighthouse by Christopher Parker: ‘Part-mystery, part-romance, part-adventure, The Lighthouse is a highly original and thought-provoking read. Parker skilfully subverts standard romantic fiction expectations, creating a tale of a young woman’s journey through grief. At its heart, it’s a story about family, an uplifting tale of love and hope, with well-drawn characters, a surprising plotline and an unforgettable setting.'

 

The Liminal Space by Jacquie McRae: ‘A cohesive novel that weaves together different compelling stories, taking a bite-sized approach to storytelling that works extremely well. The distinctive voices of each character are a joy, and the interweaving of these separate tales is especially well done. The dark elements of the novel, such as partner violence, are handled with a great deal of sensitivity, while the dominant theme is that people who need people are the luckiest.’

 

The Remarkable Miss Digby by Patricia Donovan: ‘This is a compelling and page-turning read that will transport you to a different time and culture, with an unforgettable heroine centre-stage. It is an impressive, immersive novel filled with descriptions that evoke place, scent and light. Donovan cultivates a sense of immediacy, and it’s a genuinely suspenseful read. The Remarkable Miss Digby opens a curtain to another vivid world.’

 

LIFESTYLE

The Edible Backyard by Kath Irvine: ‘Kath Irvine’s practical guide for growing organic food in your own backyard all year round would normally be a welcome addition to the bookshelf of any keen gardener. But its release during a pandemic where supply chain issues highlight the question of food security is genius. Add to food security woes the looming climate crisis and an urgent need to reduce pollution from food miles, and the perennial issue of reducing the health impact of pesticides and herbicides commonly used by conventional food growers, and Kath Irvine’s book becomes the solution many are seeking.’

 

Fish of the Day by Clarke Gayford and Mike Bhana: ‘Clarke Gayford teamed up with his long-time friend, documentary maker, Mike Bhana to create the popular television series Fish of the Day. This attractive hardcover is a companion to the series. The book follows the same format as the show combining spectacular photography, armchair travel and ocean ecology as the authors tackle each new species for a catch of the day. The day ends when the bounty is handed over to a well-known chef to prepare. It’s this unique approach that ensures Fish of the Day is not only inspiring and educational but also full of mouth-watering recipes for seafood lovers.’

 

Homecooked: Seasonal recipes for every day by Lucy Corry, The Kitchenmaid: ‘A truly superb book. The presentation is stunning, managing to be both contemporary and classic, a handsome hardback that home cooks will treasure and display in their kitchens. The recipes are arranged seasonally and make heroes of everyday ingredients that are easy to find in Aotearoa. Homecooked celebrates the joy of cooking, with simple but delicious recipes that will revive your tastebuds.’

 

Saffron Swirls and Cardamom Dust by Ashia Ismail-Singer: ‘The luscious cover of Saffron Swirls and Cardamom Dust is guaranteed to impress! Inside, every page is visually dripping in sweetness. Ashia Ismail-Singer offers an awe-inspiring collection of spice-infused desserts and homemade delights. She creatively reinvents Western classics with a spicy twist and offers Eastern staples with her unique twist. There’s no mistaking Ashia’s passion, and this divine cookbook will elevate bakers to the next level. Saffron Swirls and Cardamom Dust is a book to treasure.’

 

Simply Food by Eleanor Ozich: ‘Between lockdowns and working from home, we’re spending a lot more time preparing food ourselves. Thankfully, Eleanor Ozich has returned with a new cookbook, Simply Food. She shares nourishing home-cooked recipes requiring less than 15 minutes of hands-on time in the kitchen. Eleanor’s delicious recipes, natural photography and inspiring words encourage readers to create healthy meals. Simply Food is a delightful guide for every day whole food recipes, including breakfasts, lunches, traybakes and one-pot wonders!’

 

Who Lived There? by Nicola McCloy: ‘A well-presented and page-turning book that cherishes many of our historic buildings and reveals the intriguing backstories that were in danger of being lost. From romantic churches to small-town taverns, from stone cottages to coastal villas, McCloy has written about buildings from all around New Zealand, producing a book that celebrates our history, but also a book that is a potential travel companion for touring around the country.’

 

CHILDREN’S

Atua: Māori Gods and Heroes by Gavin Bishop: ‘Is a richly illustrated and vivid compendium of Aotearoa’s Māori creation story and pantheon of gods and heroes. A wonderful addition to any bookshelf, this is a resource to be treasured.’

 

The Eight Gifts of Te Wheke by Steph Matuku: ‘Tells the story of a greedy octopus who likes to collect treasures and the children who trick him. The vibrancy of the narrative combined with illustrations which crackle with colour and energy make this a delightful picture book.’

 

The Greatest Haka Festival on Earth by Pania Tahau-Hodges: ‘Follows Nan and her mokopuna to Te Matatini, where they compete in kapa haka. The use of humour, dialogue and colourful, detailed illustrations make this a book filled with energy as well as providing insight into, and knowledge of, an important Māori cultural event.’

 

Kia Kaha: A Storybook of Māori Who Changed the World by Stacey Morrison and Jeremy Sherlock: ‘An inspiring compendium celebrates Māori who have incredible things. This is a highly engaging book and wonderful resource that will fill readers of all ages with hope and aroha.’

 

Kōwhai and the Giants by Kate Parker: ‘A creative story inspires and shares a vision of reforesting Aotearoa, one seedling at a time. With intricate and detailed illustrations that captivate the reader, this is a gorgeous book that will kindle a desire to not only spend time in nature but, more importantly, to nurture it.’   

 

My Elephant is Blue written by Melinda Szymanik: ‘Is a gentle and sweet story which subtly gives children the space to accept their more difficult feelings. A timely story, this book assumes kids' intelligence and is paired with Vasanti Unka’s stunning illustrations, making it a wonderful read.’

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