war

The RSA is a huge institution in New Zealand and still today has over 100,000 members. It can be subtly different from region to region and in many places remains in touch with and part of the local community. Looking back we see it initially as a club for the servicemen returned from the First… Read More

This is a departure for Sebastian Barry, a book set entirely in mid to late nineteenth century America. We follow the fortunes of two young men, John Cole and Thomas McNulty, who sign up for the army and end up fighting in the Indian Wars and then the Civil War. I say it is a… Read More

This book has a long sub-title, “My Extraordinary Life while Hiding in Plain Sight”, which instantly drew me. I find the concept of working as a spy or a secret agent, while at the same time remaining totally inconspicuous, part of the fascinating myth that has grown up about the profession. So I was hoping… Read More

It is great to approach history from a different angle, especially in order to gain a new perspective on events. In this book Anne Sebba forces us to reconsider a momentous decade for France, beginning with the German occupation of Paris in 1940, from the point of view of the women of the city. It… Read More

John Boyne had great success with his deeply moving The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas. In his new World War II, Nazi- inspired novel he delivers a similar formula. It is a somewhat slow book with a punch at the end. When I say slow, I don’t mean boring, but it's the pace at which… Read More

Harry Ricketts gave a talk about the Great War at the Tauranga Arts Festival. He began the session by reading two poems, the familiar Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, and another by a New Zealander which is included in this book, Gold Stripe by Donald H Lea. I have always loved the Owen poem… Read More

Told through the eyes of 10-year-old Zac, living in 1968 Wellington and a 21-year-old World War 1 soldier, The Battle of Messines Road is a coming of age story, a war diary and a novel about friendship and families. While reading New Zealand military histories on WW1, William Moloney would often see quotes from a… Read More

I would describe myself as a fan of Louis de Bernières and so when this book arrived I jumped straight in. Sadly, I’m not convinced that de Bernières did that himself. This is a hard review to write, but this was not my favourite read of the year. This is a WWI book that opens… Read More

Page 1 of 5
1 2 3 5