humour

The latest novel from Salman Rushdie sits very firmly in the present world, the world of unreality that lurks just outside our window. It is a big contrast to his most recent novels, The Enchantress of Florence and Two years Eight months and Twenty-eight nights which stand firmly in the historical and mythological, imagined fantasies… Read More

The Music Shop is a good fun read. For a moment I was worried that its music store setting might make it similar to Nick Hornby’s Hi Fidelity from 1995, but those fears quickly vanished. This music shop is owned by Frank, a tall ungainly man who has one special talent, the ability to read… Read More

In her new standalone, satirical novel, bestselling author Sophie Kinsella offers some sharp observations of these days when social media is king and what you see is very seldom what you get. Generously peppered with her trademark humour, workplace drama and budding love, My Not So Perfect Life is a quirky read with delightful characters… Read More

How Not to Fall in Love, Actually is one of my favourite types of novels. That is, it’s the type that sets the bar really high so that any books of the genre I read after it have to work really hard to stand up against it. Debut novelist Catherine Bennetto has written exactly my… Read More

Back in 2014, well-known author Kate de Goldi approached Gecko Press publisher Julia Marshall with an idea aimed to revitalize the reading experience for upper primary school children and create lifetime readers. Those children, and their families, are lucky Marshall jumped at the opportunity and took a punt on Annual.  “We wanted Annual to be a game… Read More

With her debut novel The Hating Game, Australian Sally Thorne has certainly made quite the first impression. Her sexy, workplace romantic comedy is utterly hilarious and completely engaging, and has received a lot of very positive hype. After reading it, I completely understand why! This book is a comical, naughty romp that had me laughing… Read More

I have always enjoyed fiction that portrays ordinary life while encompassing a touch of the extraordinary. Chocolat, by Joanne Harris, and Like Water for Chocolate, by Laura Esquivel, are two that instantly spring to mind – and yes, as you might be able to tell from these examples, I also adore food-based novels. In screenwriter… Read More

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