Book Reviews

The problem with reviewing a book that you love is that it is often hard to describe just why you like the book so much - the usual adages of ‘good characterisations’, ‘innovative plot line’ and ‘page-turning entertainment’ are the obvious explanations, but often that is simply not enough. This is especially the case when… Read More

Jack Masselin is the most popular guy at Martin Van Buren High. He has the prettiest girlfriend, the coolest afro, and everyone wants to be him. But Jack also has a secret. He is suffering from prosopagnosia, also known as face blindness. He is unable to recognise anyone in his life, be they friend, foe… Read More

Lucy Dillon’s uplifting and satisfying new comfort read, about family and love, offers a satisfying literary escape that will tug at your heartstrings. Chock-full of thought-provoking themes that include parenting, marriage, honesty and choices, All I Ever Wanted tackles both emotional issues and family dynamics in an easy, well-paced story, complete with a loveable pair… Read More

The North Water was one of the titles from last year’s Man Booker Prize long list and I was impressed. This is an excellent piece of historical fiction, which crosses the boundaries into the thriller genre. It works equally well in both. Having finished the book, I reflected on why I enjoyed it so much… Read More

This is a departure for Sebastian Barry, a book set entirely in mid to late nineteenth century America. We follow the fortunes of two young men, John Cole and Thomas McNulty, who sign up for the army and end up fighting in the Indian Wars and then the Civil War. I say it is a… Read More

I found this novel excellent. It worked so well on lots of levels. Very simply, it is the story of an extended family over time. It begins at the christening party for Franny Keating, where the uninvited Bert Cousins turns up and kisses Beverley Keating, the young girl's mother. This sets the whole story in… Read More

Daniel and Natasha couldn’t be more different. Whereas Daniel believes in fate, destiny and the Great Meaning of Life, Natasha believes in facts, data, and that life is nothing but a repetition of patterns. Facts and data are what help her make sense of life, especially at times like the present. Her family is in… Read More

This is a good yarn from a writer who is more familiar for several Russian themed novels such as Gorky Park and Red Square. The Girl from Venice is set in the final days of the Second World War, with Italy on the cusp of defeat as the Americans slowly push north through the country… Read More

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