Tanya Allport

Tanya is a freelance writer, reviewer and blogger with a background in comparative literature. When she is not reading fabulous new books or writing about them, you can find her horse riding or walking her dogs in the beautiful Waitakere ranges. Visit Tanya at livingwritingreading.com.

Books

Food to Make you Glow, by Lola Berry

In an era where cooking and nutrition advice is often just a Google search away, the future of the good old fashioned print cookbook might seem uncertain. Gone are the times of our parent’s era, when cooking instructions came in the form of New Zealand’s culinary staple Edmonds Cookery book, or – for the very [...]

Commonwealth, by Ann Patchett

The problem with reviewing a book that you love is that it is often hard to describe just why you like the book so much - the usual adages of ‘good characterisations’, ‘innovative plot line’ and ‘page-turning entertainment’ are the obvious explanations, but often that is simply not enough. This is especially the case when [...]

The Wonder, by Emma Donoghue

In contemporary Western society, the concept of female self-starvation is something that most of us would have encountered, whether it is through popular diet plans that make claims on how to achieve the ideal svelte figure broadcast by fashionable celebrities, to the other end of the spectrum, where girls and women seek to self-regulate their [...]

Split Milk Yoga

Spilt Milk Yoga, by Cathryn Monro

For many of us, motherhood can be the single most determining factor that influences how we feel about our lives, how we respond to others and to ourselves, and how we live in the many little day-to-day moments. Actress Meryl Streep summarised it well when she stated that ‘Motherhood has a very humanizing effect. Everything gets [...]

For the Love of Bookshops

At the risk of sounding like I have been around for way too many years, I remember a time when everything you read came printed on paper – that’s right, that mystical age before computers, the internet and e-readers. That age, before the written word was acquirable at the touch of a fingertip, manifesting as [...]

The Agency, by Ian Austin

The Agency, by Ian Austin

One of the many pieces of famous advice that has been given to writers over time is to “write what you know”, which in the case of Ian Austin’s novel The Agency is one of those instances where such advice has resulted in the creation of an intelligent foray into crime fiction. As an ex-detective, [...]

woman grass reading book

Why Life is Too Short for Bad Books

When it comes to choosing a book, the old saying that “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” can surely be applied. While bestseller lists and the “must reads” of the moment might give an indication as to how publishing companies and booksellers are measuring the success of book sales, it is not really a [...]

The Crime Writer

The Crime Writer, by Jill Dawson

There is no doubt that Patricia Highsmith was one of those enigmatic, hard-to-pin-down authors, who hated being labelled a “crime writer”. An author of numerous psychological thrillers and mysteries, including the Tom Ripley series, and Strangers on a Train - which was famously adapted to film by Alfred Hitchcock – Highsmith is known for her [...]

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