Marcus Hobson

Marcus Hobson Marcus was until recently a businessman but has given all that up to follow his lifelong passion to be a writer. With a varied career behind him, including a degree in Ancient and Mediaeval History (and archaeology) he has wide ranging literary tastes from popular fiction to Viking sea burials. He is currently working on his second novel, a mix of fact and fiction set in the First World War (and crossing his fingers about getting his first book published). Marcus lives near Tauranga with his wife and their daughters.

Books

After the War

After the War, by Stephen Clarke

The RSA is a huge institution in New Zealand and still today has over 100,000 members. It can be subtly different from region to region and in many places remains in touch with and part of the local community. Looking back we see it initially as a club for the servicemen returned from the First [...]

Moonglow, by Michael Chabon

Moonglow, by Michael Chabon

This was my first novel by Michael Chabon and it is a great read. At 430 pages this is a long deathbed confession to the author from a character known only as "my grandfather" throughout the book. He is certainly a man with a sense of humour and I found him extremely likeable. Grandfather had [...]

Nutshell, by Ian McEwan

Nutshell, by Ian McEwan

This is a great addition to the long list of great novels that Ian McEwan has produced. There were two or three that missed the mark for me – Sunday, Solar and Sweet Tooth. But his previous novel to this, The Children Act, was excellent and this latest is McEwan back to his very best. [...]

The North Water

The North Water, by Ian McGuire

The North Water was one of the titles from last year’s Man Booker Prize long list and I was impressed. This is an excellent piece of historical fiction, which crosses the boundaries into the thriller genre. It works equally well in both. Having finished the book, I reflected on why I enjoyed it so much. [...]

Days Without End, by Sebastian Barry

Days Without End, by Sebastian Barry

This is a departure for Sebastian Barry, a book set entirely in mid to late nineteenth century America. We follow the fortunes of two young men, John Cole and Thomas McNulty, who sign up for the army and end up fighting in the Indian Wars and then the Civil War. I say it is a [...]

Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

Commonwealth, by Ann Patchett

I found this novel excellent. It worked so well on lots of levels. Very simply, it is the story of an extended family over time. It begins at the christening party for Franny Keating, where the uninvited Bert Cousins turns up and kisses Beverley Keating, the young girl's mother. This sets the whole story in [...]

The Girl From Venice By Martin Cruz Smith

The Girl from Venice, by Martin Cruz Smith

This is a good yarn from a writer who is more familiar for several Russian themed novels such as Gorky Park and Red Square. The Girl from Venice is set in the final days of the Second World War, with Italy on the cusp of defeat as the Americans slowly push north through the country. [...]

The Pier Falls by Mark Haddon

The Pier Falls, by Mark Haddon

It used to be that authors would often start their publishing careers with a collection of short stories before graduating to a full-length novel. Mark Haddon has gone about things the other way around, pushing out three fine novels before attempting a collection of short stories. His first novel, The Curious Incident of the Dog [...]

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