Marcus Hobson

Marcus Hobson Marcus was until recently a businessman but has given all that up to follow his lifelong passion to be a writer. With a varied career behind him, including a degree in Ancient and Mediaeval History (and archaeology) he has wide ranging literary tastes from popular fiction to Viking sea burials. He is currently working on his second novel, a mix of fact and fiction set in the First World War (and crossing his fingers about getting his first book published). Marcus lives near Tauranga with his wife and their daughters, and is the Literary Editor of ARTbop, a local online magazine .

Books

Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

There has been lots of hype and many glowing reviews of Lincoln in the Bardo, but I have to confess that I can't see what all the fuss is about. I think I was expecting more. Without a doubt it is an experimental novel; it certainly shows us that pushing the boundaries with fiction has [...]

The Girl Before by J P Delaney

This was quite simply a roller coaster of a novel. It has everything that is needed from a good psychological thriller. None of us react well when there are too many rules, but when an architect creates hundred of rules about how to live in one of the houses he built, there are only a [...]

A Crime in the Family by Sacha Batthyany

I enjoyed A Crime in the Family. It is promoted as revealing one of the most extraordinary untold stories of the Second World War. In reality it describes one man’s search to understand his own and his family’s past history and the dark secrets that lurk within. As a journey of personal discovery, I was [...]

The Good People by Hannah Kent

What an excellent book; a really engrossing read that is brilliantly written. Sometimes it is hard to pinpoint exactly what it is about a novel that makes it so good, and makes you read it in a rush. Just making the reader eager to keep turning the pages is one of those factors. But for [...]

After the War

After the War, by Stephen Clarke

The RSA is a huge institution in New Zealand and still today has over 100,000 members. It can be subtly different from region to region and in many places remains in touch with and part of the local community. Looking back we see it initially as a club for the servicemen returned from the First [...]

Moonglow, by Michael Chabon

Moonglow, by Michael Chabon

This was my first novel by Michael Chabon and it is a great read. At 430 pages this is a long deathbed confession to the author from a character known only as "my grandfather" throughout the book. He is certainly a man with a sense of humour and I found him extremely likeable. Grandfather had [...]

Nutshell, by Ian McEwan

Nutshell, by Ian McEwan

This is a great addition to the long list of great novels that Ian McEwan has produced. There were two or three that missed the mark for me – Sunday, Solar and Sweet Tooth. But his previous novel to this, The Children Act, was excellent and this latest is McEwan back to his very best. [...]

The North Water

The North Water, by Ian McGuire

The North Water was one of the titles from last year’s Man Booker Prize long list and I was impressed. This is an excellent piece of historical fiction, which crosses the boundaries into the thriller genre. It works equally well in both. Having finished the book, I reflected on why I enjoyed it so much. [...]

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